Full screen zoom

<< Previous page

Antique Derby Porcelain Fruit or Ice Coolers, Covers & Liners, 
Pattern 142,  Circa 1797.
Painting possibly by William Billingsley, After William Curtis' The Botanical Magazine, Circa 1795-1810.


Antique Derby Porcelain Fruit or Ice Coolers, Covers & Liners,

Pattern 142,  

Painting possibly by William Billingsley,

After William Curtis' The Botanical Magazine,

Circa 1797-1810.


Dimensions: 9 inches wide x 9 inches & 9 3/4 inches on second high. (22.86cm high x 22.86 cm & 24.77cm )


Superb pair of fruit coolers, covers and liners painted with named botanical specimens to sides and covers after William Curtis from The Botanical Magazine.  Also with finely painted rose bands around cover and rim.  Each flower named in English and some in Latin too in underglaze blue script to underside.


The flowers from William Curtis' The Botanical Magazine (see below)


 One finial slightly higher than other.


Cooler One: Cover Tulipo/ tulip and Narcissus/ Jonquil.

Body: Crown and D & Battens.

Winter Hellebore,  (Curtis Botanical Magazine No. 3 , Winter Hellebore ,1786) or Aconite & Silver edged Primula (No. 191 (Primrose) The Botanical Magazine. London 1792)


Cooler Two: Cover- Crown & D & Battens & 142 in blue

Flowers

Heath Leav'd St Johns-Wort & Pinnated Slipper-wort


Body: Crown, D & Battens in blue in center and

Birch-leav'd Crane's Billy (Birch-leaved Cranesbill) (Volume 5, No. 148) & Rose Cistus (Volume 2, No, 43)


Provenance: Private Collection;

Collection of Richard Mellon Scaife

Earle D. Vandekar of Knightsbridge, Inc.


Reference:  John Twitchett, Derby Porcelain, p,192, fig 231.


William Curtis was an 18th century Englishman who devoted his life to the study of botanicals. The arrival of exotic botanical specimens to Europe prompted a demand for detailed and accurate information concerning the new plants. The Botanical Magazine or Flower-Garden Display'd, later known as Curtis' Botanical Magazine, was issued in a small format, in monthly installments. Each installment arrived wrapped in blue papers and contained three hand-colored botanical illustrations with text describing each plant and its attributes. The first issue of the Botanical Magazine was published February 1787 and was an immediate success. It is considered to be the first horticultural magazine.







If you would like to see the retail price of this item, please register with us.

 

Send the image and details to a friend:
Your Name:
Friend's Email:
Subject: